000: Philosophy (aka “What’s this Podcast All About?”)

 

I always thought the infant phase would be the hardest part of parenting, when all the baby does is eat and sleep and cry.  Now I have a toddler I’m finding it’s harder than having a baby, some of the support systems that I had when she was a baby aren’t there any more, and the parenting skills I need are totally different.  How do I even know what I need to learn to not mess up this parenting thing?  Should I go back to school to try to figure it all out?

In this episode I’ll tell you the history and principles behind the podcast and what we’ll learn together.

References

(On the topic of Reggio Emilia): Edwards, C., Gandini, L., & Forman, G. (Eds). (2012). The hundred languages of children. Santa Barbara: Praeger

(On the topic of Resources for Infant Educarers/RIE): Gerber, M. & Johnson, A. (1988). Your self-confident baby. New York: Wiley

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4 Comments

  1. Barb Buckner Suarez on March 5, 2018 at 9:31 PM

    Jen: WOW – Just found your podcast. I’m a Childbirth Educator and Becoming Us Facilitator and I am so happy to be sharing this particular episode with my subscribers in my monthly newsletter. I appreciate your philosophy so much and I love the evidence-based, research-heavy lifting that you do to back up whatever topic you’re discussing. Excellent resource that I will be promoting to my families! Thank you!!!

    • Jen Lumanlan on July 11, 2018 at 8:39 PM

      Thanks, Barb – so glad you find the show useful!

  2. Sarah on June 17, 2018 at 12:46 PM

    Hi Jen,
    I’ve been a loyal listener, probably since the beginning of your show. I suffered from postpartum after the birth of my daughter in August 2016. Your podcast has been part of my self-care routine. Listening to it each week and then every other week helped me engage my brain and think as an adult while on maternity leave and beyond.

    I am a public school teacher. I’m going into my 10th year in August. I’ve done one year in Kindergarten and nine years in 1st grade (3 of those years have been in a classroom called “inclusion”). While sometimes I disagree with how public education is depicted in your podcast, I enjoy hearing an alternative, outside perspective. I’ll be honest, some of what I’ve learned and applied to my own family, has been applied to how I teach my students. I practice respect with my students. I give them opportunities to be problem-solvers. I try my best to consider their age and development while guiding them to grow. One of my fellow teachers has commented that I’m overly kind to my students. My classroom is calm. Mistakes are allowed to be made. Best of all, my students are loved and behavior is managed with mutual respect. I try to make learning an experience while still meeting the requirements of my district and state. I am also a grad student, finishing up my degree in Education Leadership.

    I’m writing to tell you thank you for the hard work and effort you have put into the podcast. It challenges my perspective and helps me grow as a mom and a teacher.

    Some topic ideas I would love to hear about:
    Whole Brain Teaching (Chris Biffle)
    How postpartum effects motherhood
    Managing children with dietary restrictions or allergies

    Thank you again for all you do and share. There’s no podcast like yours.

    • Jen Lumanlan on July 11, 2018 at 4:07 PM

      Hi Sarah – thanks so much for your comment. If all school teachers were like you, and perhaps if we could change the system so you weren’t “bucking the trend” but were just “how school is done,” I’d put my daughter in school:-)

      Thanks also for the suggestions for topics. I’ll check into Whole Brain Teaching (which makes intuitive sense to me) and how postpartum affects motherhood. I’m afraid the dietary restrictions/allergies strays a bit from my core mission/expertise on the cognitive/social/emotional aspects of parenting and child development so that issue might be better handled by someone else.

      Glad you’re enjoying the show – please do consider sharing it with your networks of people who might appreciate it!

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